In case you missed our post last week, we’ve been looking at how TV viewers use social media to talk about the shows they watch. Here’s a quick recap: During a show, people post short check-ins and quick comments; between shows, they recap their favorite scenes and dissect the details of episodes. The latter conversation accounted for 61% of all the social activity around a show, and that conversation was happening largely on Tumblr.
So what happens to the content that makes up that conversation? It gets disseminated across Tumblr, and out across the social web. Fans on Tumblr reblogged the top five most-shared posts in the study for more than 137 hours, compared to just 15 hours of retweeting the most popular Tweets.
Tumblr was also the source of 99% of all episode-related content that we found on other social networks, which we were able to measure by tracking URLs back to individual users. During the study window, more than 46K Tumblr posts were shared on Twitter and 1,400 on Facebook. At the same time, just 223 pieces of content were directed back to Tumblr. 
What we found when we looked at sharing patterns on Tumblr is that our community is seeding the web with content. They advocate and evangelize their favorite shows through fan fiction, original art, and episode mash-ups, that in turn expose new viewers to the show.
For broadcast networks, there’s an opportunity to leverage these communities and reach a wider audience by taking content from the shows they’ve already created and aired, and making it available to the fans on Tumblr to engage and share. 

In case you missed our post last week, we’ve been looking at how TV viewers use social media to talk about the shows they watch. Here’s a quick recap: During a show, people post short check-ins and quick comments; between shows, they recap their favorite scenes and dissect the details of episodes. The latter conversation accounted for 61% of all the social activity around a show, and that conversation was happening largely on Tumblr.

So what happens to the content that makes up that conversation? It gets disseminated across Tumblr, and out across the social web. Fans on Tumblr reblogged the top five most-shared posts in the study for more than 137 hours, compared to just 15 hours of retweeting the most popular Tweets.

Tumblr was also the source of 99% of all episode-related content that we found on other social networks, which we were able to measure by tracking URLs back to individual users. During the study window, more than 46K Tumblr posts were shared on Twitter and 1,400 on Facebook. At the same time, just 223 pieces of content were directed back to Tumblr. 

What we found when we looked at sharing patterns on Tumblr is that our community is seeding the web with content. They advocate and evangelize their favorite shows through fan fiction, original art, and episode mash-ups, that in turn expose new viewers to the show.

For broadcast networks, there’s an opportunity to leverage these communities and reach a wider audience by taking content from the shows they’ve already created and aired, and making it available to the fans on Tumblr to engage and share. 

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